You are not logged in.

  • "The_Wayne" started this thread

Posts: 2,329

Date of registration: Jul 24th 2004

Location: Kelheim, Bayern

  • Send private message

31

Monday, November 12th 2018, 12:33pm

Hallo!

Ich hab' noch was zu Zonal herausgefunden:

Anscheinend war das Werk in Redhill, genaue Anschrift: Holmethorpe Ave, Redhill, Vereinigtes Königreich. Eine Hausnummer ist leider nicht angegeben, das Werk scheint also irgendwo hier gewesen zu sein. Laut einer Quelle (tapeheads) wurde es bereits Anfang der 90er geschlossen. Das könnte das Stammwerk gewesen sein.
Zu dem Werk in Schottland findet man kaum Informationen, allerdings soll das auch schon in den 90ern geschlossen worden sein.

Kann es sein, dass die Zonal-Bänder, die man vor ca. zehn Jahren noch neu kaufen konnte, alle NOS waren?
Grüße

Wayne

Posts: 3,973

Date of registration: Dec 20th 2015

Location: bei Hamburg

Occupation: Rentner

  • Send private message

32

Monday, November 12th 2018, 1:54pm

In Peters Beitrag zum Capture-Band von SPLICIT hatte ich schon mal auf Äußerungen von dessen Besitzer bezüglich Zonal aufmerksam gemacht.
Hier nochmal:
Bei SPLICIT gibt es einen Link zu einem Aufsatz mit Hintergrund- und Review-Informationen zum Capture Band, der ganz lesenswert ist:
https://www.monoandstereo.com/2016/03/ca…n-block_23.html
Darin ist u.a. zu lesen:
Zitat:
Well, let’s the owner of the company, Roger Cunningham, speak by himself:
"...it’s Bias properties are very similar to the old Quantegy 456. We are trying to bring you a tape that is affordable and yet quality made. It is not our intention to sell “re-branded” old tape from Quantegy, Ampex, Zonal or anyone else. The 820 and 840 series numbers are from the manufacturer. We have partnered with the manufacturer that used to make tape for Zonal. It has been improved and upgraded and is being produced fresh for us."
Zitat-Ende
Den möglicherweise zu Zonal-Bändern aufschlußreichen Satz habe ich fett hervorgehoben.

MfG Kai

  • "The_Wayne" started this thread

Posts: 2,329

Date of registration: Jul 24th 2004

Location: Kelheim, Bayern

  • Send private message

33

Monday, November 12th 2018, 2:44pm

Ah, ja, das hatte ich im anderen Thread auch gelesen. Demnach hatte Zonal zum Schluss einen Auftragsfertiger, wer auch immer das war. War es aber nicht so, dass die Produktion der Zonal-Bänder dewegen eingestellt wurde, weil das Slitten nicht mehr richtig funktionierte bzw. die Breite dann außerhalb der Toleranz war? Oder täusche ich mich da und war das jemand anders? Ich finde den Thread leider nicht mehr.
Die Reparatur der Anlagen soll nicht möglich oder unwirtschaftlich gewesen sein, deshalb die Einstellung.
Grüße

Wayne

Posts: 3,973

Date of registration: Dec 20th 2015

Location: bei Hamburg

Occupation: Rentner

  • Send private message

34

Monday, November 12th 2018, 3:07pm

Genau davon war in diesem Text auch die Rede beim Test der ersten Capture Bänder.
Als ich eben noch mal in dem o.a. Link die Textpassage suchen wollte, war der ganze Text verschwunden.
Zur Zeit ist da nur ein leeres weißes Feld zu sehen.

MfG Kai

Posts: 2,305

Date of registration: Dec 19th 2014

Location: Krefeld

Occupation: Tonmeister

  • Send private message

35

Monday, November 12th 2018, 3:56pm

Zur Zeit ist da nur ein leeres weißes Feld zu sehen.

Ich habe über den in #32 zitierten Text bei Google dieselbe URL aufgerufen, und siehe, der Text ist wieder da ...

Hier der Link, den Google mir übermittelt hat:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=…n-block_23.html

Und hier der komplette Text, bevor er irgendwann doch noch verschütt geht ...

Capture Audio Tape the new kid on the block!

What? Another new analog tape on the open reel audio niche? Who needs another tape? Are these people crazy? Those are some of the interrogatives from the open reel users when they heard about the new Capture Tape from Oregon. In my case, I didn’t play the skeptic this time. On the contrary; I was really happy to know that now is the best time to be an open reel aficionado!

Splicit is the name of the brave people who took this enterprise on hand and is contributing more than many to expand the life of a “once lost” hobby: open reel recording. Who are they? Well, let’s the owner of the company, Roger Cunningham, speak by himself: We created Splicit Reel Audio Products 13 years ago to help preserve analog tape media. We are a small company and we work very hard to bring you quality products at fair prices. We will not be “re-branding” anyone’s old unused tape nor will any components used in marketing the tape be “cheap”. The tape is not plastic…it is Polyester and yes it’s Bias properties are very similar to the old Quantegy 456. We are trying to bring you a tape that is affordable and yet quality made. It is not our intention to sell “re-branded” old tape from Quantegy, Ampex, Zonal or anyone else. The 820 and 840 series numbers are from the manufacturer. We have partnered with the manufacturer that used to make tape for Zonal. It has been improved and upgraded and is being produced fresh for us. I believe this is a good product that will perform quite nicely as a general purpose music recording tape in the home. I personally have tested it on Ampex, Otari, Tascam and several other decks with excellent results. I was pleasantly surprised. It reproduces nice clean highs and solid punchy bass. It should also be known that we are not in competition with Pyral or ATR. They are both excellent products and have their places in the marketplace. As I have stated before…we simply wanted to offer you a quality recording tape at a great price. I think you’ll be pleased. 7” x 1200’ and 7” x 1800’ reels and pancakes of 1/4” x 2500’ and 1/4” 3600’ will all be available soon. Prices will be announced soon. The name will be known as “Capture”.

There you go folks. Clearer than the Coors Light Rocky Mountains water, ha! The man believes in his project and it’s been very honest and realistic. He’s not interested to embark on a work against the 2 reigning giants but he’s offering a new alternative, specifically for the home recordist.

The Tape: We received our sample “on the hub” in a cardboard box. The appearance of the tape in general is completely neat, tightly packed, dark color and in excellent condition. The “candy” smell filled my recording studio C for a while, probably as a result of the solvent used during the manufacturing process. I have to confess that I never used Zonal tape during the 90’s and don’t know much about that company either,so, I’m fresh to this tape as my Crown CX-822 is to the Capture’s formula. By the way; this is what the tape developer himself told me:

The formula is not owned or never was owned by Zonal. It is the property of the company I am working with. We have made some more slight changes to the formulation and corrected any width problems.

We proceeded to take the hub and put it inside an Ampex 456 flanges that I keep for this purpose and loaded it into its final destination: an empty TDK LX-50 aluminum reel. During the winding process we immediately noticed the problem mentioned to us about the slitting and indeed, the tape is a hair wider than it should be! Heavy debris accumulated on the tape guides to the point that it was intervening with the tape loading into the receiving reel. We took some close up photos for you to see how bad it is. Anyway, we were told in advance about this situation,so we just cleaned the guides and continued with our tests. No problem at all. Our stretch test was done and compared to the Pyral and ATR. This tape is thinner. No doubt about it. ATR is the thickest, followed by Pyral and then Capture. This is not an indication of quality in any sense and usually the thicker the tape the strongest, but the thinner tape usually molds better to the heads geometry! When I was in the tape duplication business, cassette tape pancakes were supplied in C-60 and C-90 thickness. We always used the C-90 because it wrapped better around the heads than the C-60 and that is a fact! You have to be a duplicator to experience it. As simple as that. After the stretch test, we ran our Crown @ 15ips for a while to check how clean the tape runs. For our surprise, besides the already mentioned debris on the guides, the heads and capstan came almost clear! So, we can say that this tape runs very clean, just as the Pyral does.


Recording: After cleaning the debris, we started our bias adj. process and just as Roger said, this tape is compatible with the Ampex 456, but not with the Pyral LPR 35 or the new ATR 36. It required us to turn the bias adj knob just 1/8 to obtain the proper bias as it was a “little under” Pyrals’ and ATR’s.

Once the proper bias was obtain, we choose a high energy material on CD playing from our Arcam/EAD CDP combo. We calibrated our levels to a constant “0” with peaks up to +3 at 250 nwb. It took all we threw at it without any stress whatsoever. Clean mids and solid bass all the time. On the highs, we belief that it is a hair darker than the other 2 brands tested, but just a hair. Decent highs, by all means, but not as extended as with the other tapes we have already tried. We’ll have to verify this at our Studio A with our weekend panel. A nice excuse for a good BBQ, Grey Goose and nice cigars!

Listening: As with the other tapes we have tested before, we invited a group of friends related with the audio business for many years . Unfortunately, this time our recording engineer extraordinaire, Mr. Papo Sanchez, was not available as he was in New York mixing someone’s project and my youngest son William, a recording aficionado and music arranger, took his place. He’s also one of Papo’s protegé. For this test we recorded a section of “Son de la Loma” track, by Orquesta Nova from New York, a Chesky’s Record, on 3 different tapes on hand: an old Maxell XL 1, ATR 36 and Capture’s. We spliced all 3: ATR, Capture and Maxell in that specific order and continuously separated by a clear leader tape. We did it this way in order for the Crown to stop after playing each section to give time for the panel to write down their reactions.

Results: Besides me, nobody else knew about the splicing order. Not even my son. We ran the tape twice and the results were consistent: the tape of the middle (Capture) was more neutral than the other 2 options and a little “darker” too. It was consistent with our original findings. Let us clarify, though, that unless you compare the Capture against other formulas, like the ones we have on hand, you wouldn’t notice any lack of “highs” and you’ll be perfectly happy with it. Guaranteed! The panel was perfectly happy with what they were hearing and could happily live with any of the tapes tested. I do have to say that the Maxell XL-1 formula has always amazed me due to its durability and excellent sound. I mean, this is a 1987 tape, bulk erased and re-recorded again after 29 years! If Capture’s tape has this kind of property we’ll have a clear winner here. Stay tuned for our follow up review in the year 2035! Ha!

Conclusions: Knowing that the industry has not abandoned us yet is a big relief. People like Splicit, committed with the analog audio and tape recording niche, gives the hobbyist an air of hope during this digital era. Not many people has the “cojones” as Roger has to embark on this kind of SAGA in a market heavily dominated by 2 giants. His passion for tape is evident as I don’t envision him to get rich with all this, but at least I’m sure that John Q. Recordist would sponsor him and acquire his tapes for home recording use. I know it because I’m one of those who already ordered the Capture’s tape as soon as the new batch arrives with the slitting problem solved. That’s how much I liked it! I wouldn’t stop endorsing Pyral or ATR either, and if the gossip I received from an old friend of mine (directly from Japan) of a Maxell’s comeback is true, I’ll surely use it too, but there will always be a significant place at our studios for Roger’s tape. That’s for sure!

NOTE: The author wants to extend his gratitude to Tapeheads and Pacific Stereo for letting us share our experiences in his website.

About the author:
Carlos J Guzman, El Magnifico, has been involved with the audio business for over 35 years. He has participated in many audio and music segments, including: recording, duplication, high end audio sales, musician and mastering engineer among many others. He is the former owner of CopyTech Coproration, what used to be the biggest media duplicator in the Caribbean. The audio business runs in his family veins as his father, the late Dr. Carlos Guzmán Sr, was one of the most accomplished popular music collectors of his era. In his mastering suite, Carlos performed over 1,000+ projects earning several gold and platinum records including a Grammy in 2002. He’s an avid vintage gear collector and specializes in cassette and open reel decks. His tape decks collection is the biggest one in Puerto Rico with over 20 pieces in perfect operating order. He holds several college degrees from the University of Puerto Rico and Fort Hays State University as well.



Grüße, Peter

  • "The_Wayne" started this thread

Posts: 2,329

Date of registration: Jul 24th 2004

Location: Kelheim, Bayern

  • Send private message

36

Monday, November 12th 2018, 10:00pm


Als ich eben noch mal in dem o.a. Link die Textpassage suchen wollte, war der ganze Text verschwunden.
Zur Zeit ist da nur ein leeres weißes Feld zu sehen.

Genau das Selbe sah ich auch. Gut das Peter den Text reinkopiert hat.

Quoted

We proceeded to take the hub and put it inside an Ampex 456 flanges that I keep for this purpose and loaded it into its final destination: an empty TDK LX-50 aluminum reel. During the winding process we immediately noticed the problem mentioned to us about the slitting and indeed, the tape is a hair wider than it should be! Heavy debris accumulated on the tape guides to the point that it was intervening with the tape loading into the receiving reel. We took some close up photos for you to see how bad it is. Anyway, we were told in advance about this situation,so we just cleaned the guides and continued with our tests. No problem at all.

Dann hatte ich das doch richtig in Erinnerung. Jemand hat es hier auch schon mal erwähnt. Niels? Martin? Ich weiß es nicht mehr.
Allerdings macht mich der Text etwas nachdenklich, denn es steht ja nirgends geschrieben, wie sie das Problem gelöst haben.

Quoted

Our stretch test was done and compared to the Pyral and ATR. This tape is thinner. No doubt about it. ATR is the thickest, followed by Pyral and then Capture. This is not an indication of quality in any sense and usually the thicker the tape the strongest, but the thinner tape usually molds better to the heads geometry! When I was in the tape duplication business, cassette tape pancakes were supplied in C-60 and C-90 thickness. We always used the C-90 because it wrapped better around the heads than the C-60 and that is a fact! You have to be a duplicator to experience it. As simple as that.

Ja, dann fahren wir doch gleich alle mit Tripleplay-Bändern, besser gehts doch gar nicht! Man sollte das doch irgendwie in Zusammenhang mit Bandzug und Geschwindigkeit bringen. Und welche Bänder sind überhaupt mit dem Dicken-Vergleich gemeint? Es ist ja nicht so, dass jeder der Hersteller nur einen Typ herstellt.
Grüße

Wayne

Posts: 1,354

Date of registration: Dec 18th 2013

  • Send private message

37

Saturday, November 17th 2018, 12:41am

Ja, dann fahren wir doch gleich alle mit Tripleplay-Bändern, besser gehts doch gar nicht! Man sollte das doch irgendwie in Zusammenhang mit Bandzug und Geschwindigkeit bringen. Und welche Bänder sind überhaupt mit dem Dicken-Vergleich gemeint? Es ist ja nicht so, dass jeder der Hersteller nur einen Typ herstellt.
Naheliegend wären ATR MDS-36 und Pyral LPR35 nachdem das die drei Bänder sind, die versuchen in der selben Liga zu spielen.

Hallo!

Ich hab' noch was zu Zonal herausgefunden:

Anscheinend war das Werk in Redhill, genaue Anschrift: Holmethorpe Ave, Redhill, Vereinigtes Königreich. Eine Hausnummer ist leider nicht angegeben, das Werk scheint also irgendwo hier gewesen zu sein. Laut einer Quelle (tapeheads) wurde es bereits Anfang der 90er geschlossen. Das könnte das Stammwerk gewesen sein.
Ehrlich? Wenn da nicht der ganze Block abgerissen und mit kleineren Gebäuden neu zugepflastert wurde (oder das Werk aus diversen kleinen Gebäuden bestand, die später einzeln verkauft wurden) war das gefühlt auch eine recht kleine Klitsche. Sollte wirklich eines dieser Gebäude das Fertigungswerk gewesen sein, würde ich am ehesten noch auf den Karosseriespengler tippen, der Bau ist mit Abstand der größte. Ich muss allerdings ehrlich zugeben, dass das mehr geraten ist, ich habe sehr vage Vorstellungen wie viel Platz eine Magnetbandfertigung benötigt.

Posts: 471

Date of registration: Jan 30th 2012

Location: RuhrgBeat

  • Send private message

38

Monday, November 19th 2018, 7:19am

TDK hat schon in den 50ern Magnetband hergestellt und 1968 mit der Cassettenproduktion begonnen.
1969 wurde das Chikumagawa Werk bei Nagano eröffnet. Dort wurde wohl ab 1970 die gesamte Audio Magntebandtechnik entwickelt und hergestellt. Auch das Superavilyn und die erste MA wurden dort entwickelt.
(Später gabs wohl noch weitere Werke in Japan, ob dann in diesen Werken aber auch Band hergestellt wurde, hab ich nicht herausgefunden.)
Werk ist noch aktiv. Nach Beendigung der Bandproduktion wurden dort optische Speichermedien entwickelt hergestellt, ist ja aber auch schon wieder Geschichte.

Adresse: Chikumagawa Techno Factory, 462-1, Otai, Saku, Nagano 385-0009
Luftbild


Ergänzung:

Zu Japan, es gab wohl neben dem Hauptwerk für Audioband Chikumagawa Werk bei Nagano wohl noch weitere Standorte die auch Band hergestellt haben. Genaue Angaben habe ich aber bisher nicht gefunden, nur die Mitteilung in einem Jahresbericht von 1995, dass 1993 alle anderen Produktionsstandorte wegen Kosteneinsparung geschlossen wurden. Und das mit Stand 1995 mehr als 50% der Bandproduktion in Thailland, Luxemburg und den USA (nur Video) stattgefunden hat.
Wohlmöglich wurde noch im TDK Akita Hirasawa Plant Magnetband hergestellt, dort ist auch das TDK Museum beheimatet.



Computerband wurde im Kofu Plant Yamanashi gecoatet.

Adresse: Kofu TDK Corp 160 Miyazawa, Minami Alps-shi, Yamanashi-ken 400-0415, Japan

Luftbild


Das TDK Werk in Irvine California (Cassettenproduktion ab 1973 und Video ab 1979) hatte keine eigene Bandproduktion. Das Vidoewerk in Peachtree Vorort von Atlanta Georgia hatte einem Billboard Bericht von 1995 nach eine eigene Bandproduktion.

Adresse: 1 T D K BlvdPeachtree City, GA 30269
Luftbild



Audiobänder und Cassetten wurden ab 1991 inm Rojana plant Thailand hergestellt. Die Imation TDK Cassetten wurden wohl auch ab 2007 noch dort hergestellt, auch wenn das Band zumindest für die SA schon aus Korea kam. Auch die Sony HF (TDK D Klone) bis 2011 stammen aus diesem Werk.
Direkter Nachbar ist das Nikon Kamerawerk, das bei der Flut 2011 komplett unter Wasser stand. Im TDK Werk wird es genauso ausgesehen haben. Ich tippe mal die Flutschäden bedeuteten das endgültige Ende der TDK Cassettenproduktion, da ein Wiederaufbau wohl nicht lohnte und/oder das Ende eh schon zeitnah gplant war. Das würde ganz gut zum langsamen Verschwinden der TDK Cassetten aus dem Handel ab Ende 2012 passen.

Adresse:Rojana Industrial Park, Moo5 Tambol Kanham, Amphor Uthai

Luftbild


Auch das Werk in Luxemburg hatte eine eigene Band und Cassettenproduktion. Eröffnet wurde das Werk 1989.
Möglicherweise hat das deutsche TDK Werk Rammelsbach auch von dort Bandmaterial erhalten.
Geschlossen wurde das Werk wohl 2006, die Bandproduktion war aber wohl schon vorher eingestellt worden. In einm TDK Jahresbericht von 2005 ist nur noch von CD-R DVD-R die Rede.

Adresse:
TDK Recording Media Europe S.A .
Z.I.Bommelscheuer, L-4902 Bascharage,Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

Luftbild

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "2245" (Nov 19th 2018, 10:01am)


Posts: 1,354

Date of registration: Dec 18th 2013

  • Send private message

39

Tuesday, December 4th 2018, 4:02pm

Noch ein interessantes Detail zu Zonal: im Tapeheads-Forum gibt es Fotos von sehr alten Zonal-Acetatbändern im Originalkarton. Hier heißt die Firma "Ilford Zonal". Das muss nichts bedeuten (Ilford ist ein Stadtteil Londons) aber könnte auch eine Verwandtschaft mit dem berühmten Filmhersteller Ilford sein, dazu würde auch Zelluloseacetat als Trägermaterial passen.

Posts: 13,300

Date of registration: Apr 4th 2004

Location: Meerbusch (bei Düsseldorf)

Occupation: Softwareentwickler

  • Send private message

40

Saturday, February 9th 2019, 4:12pm

Mir fiel noch was ein: Was ist eigentlich, abseits von PDMagnetics, mit DuPont? Es gab doch mal irgendwelche Handelsmarken-Kassetten (Sound Tape 3/4? - evtl. auch noch andere), auf deren Verpackung mit "Bandmaterial von DuPont USA" geworben wurde. Steckte da Band von PDM aus niederländischer Produktion drin, oder hat DuPont tatsächlich auch ohne Philips Band produziert?

Posts: 2,486

Date of registration: Jul 5th 2006

Location: Norrköping

  • Send private message

41

Saturday, February 9th 2019, 8:38pm

Das ist in der Tat noch ein relativ wenig erforschter Fleck auf der Bänder-Landkarte. Auch auf den älteren Chromdioxid-Cassetten von Mark II gab es einen Hinweis auf Du Pont.

Ich sehe zwei Möglichkeiten:

1. Du Pont hat wirklich Bänder hergestellt. Was mich im Fall von Ferrochrom (Sound Tape 4) allerdings wundern würde, weil sonst nirgendwo ein Ferrochrom-Band auftaucht, das mit Du Pont in Verbindung gebracht wird. Bei den gewöhnlichen Chromdioxid-Bändern halte ich es für wahrscheinlicher. Es gab z.B. schon sehr früh die Chrom-Cassetten von Advent, die auch unter dem Du-Pont-Produktnamen Crolyn verkauft wurden. Ebenso kenne ich von einem Bild eine ähnlcih alte Cassette namens Advocate Crolyn, wobei mir Advocate in dem Zusammenhang gar nichts sagt.

2. Es geht nicht um das komplette Band, sondern nur um das Chromdioxid-Pigment. Dafür gab es wohl weltweit nur zwei Hersteller: Du Pont und BASF. Alle anderen Produzenten von Chromdioxidbändern kauften das Pigment von einem der beiden Chemiekonzerne (bzw. in Japan noch über den dortigen Exklusiv-Lizenznehmer Sony, der aber das Pigment auch von Du Pont bezog). Dann wären die Angaben auf den Billigcassetten eventuell teilweise richtig, aber doch etwas unscharf.

Vielleicht geben alte Billboard-Ausgaben auf Google Books ja einen entscheidenden Hinweis.

Viele Grüße,
Martin

Posts: 13,300

Date of registration: Apr 4th 2004

Location: Meerbusch (bei Düsseldorf)

Occupation: Softwareentwickler

  • Send private message

42

Sunday, February 10th 2019, 9:31am

2. Es geht nicht um das komplette Band, sondern nur um das Chromdioxid-Pigment. Dafür gab es wohl weltweit nur zwei Hersteller: Du Pont und BASF.


Offtopic: Hat Bayer nicht auch Chromdioxid produziert? In dem englischsprachigen Wikipedia-Artikel liest es sich sogar so, als täten sie das noch heute, ebenso zwei Firmen in Japan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromium(IV)_oxide#Producers

Posts: 2,486

Date of registration: Jul 5th 2006

Location: Norrköping

  • Send private message

43

Monday, February 11th 2019, 2:47pm

Auch hier liegt noch Einiges im Dunkeln. Bei Bayer/Agfa war ich mir eigentlich ziemlich sicher, daß sie zwar selbst Chromdioxid-Bänder beschichtet haben, die Pigmente dabei aber anfangs von Du Pont und später von BASF zugekauft hat. Dazu steht sogar was im dicken Buch (Zeitschichten), muß ich heute Abend nachsehen. Von den beiden japanischen Firmen habe ich noch nie gehört, aber das will nichts heißen.

Besonders interessant an dem Wiki-Artikel finde ich folgende Passage:

Quoted

Dupont and BASF had also introduced chrome-cobalt "blended" oxide pigments which combined about 70% cobalt-modified iron oxide with 30% chrome oxide into a single coating, presumably to offer improved performance at lower costs than pure chrome.


Bisher war mir nur das "Croco"-Band mit 85 % Chromdioxid und 15 % Kobalt bekannt. Kann es sein, daß sich das bei Wiki erwähnte 70/30-Band in den letzten CS II und CM II verbirgt, die sich größtenteils wie FeCo-Bänder verhalten, aber irgendwie doch ein wenig an Chromdioxidbänder erinnern (niedriges Rauschen, schwarze Farbe)?

Viele Grüße,
Martin

Posts: 387

Date of registration: Mar 29th 2016

Location: Dresden

Occupation: Prozesstechniker Halbleiterbereich

  • Send private message

44

Monday, February 11th 2019, 3:31pm

Chromdioxid-Pigment. Dafür gab es wohl weltweit nur zwei Hersteller: Du Pont und BASF.

Ist das wirklich so ? Ich hatte mir eingebildet gelesen zu haben, das ORWO in Wolfen ebenfalls eine Du Pont Lizenz besaß und das Pigment selbst herstellte. Die hätten es ja sonst für teure Devisen importieren müssen, was ich mir nicht vorstellen kann. Habt ihr dazu gesicherte Kenntnisse ?

Grüße, Rainer

Posts: 2,305

Date of registration: Dec 19th 2014

Location: Krefeld

Occupation: Tonmeister

  • Send private message

45

Monday, February 11th 2019, 10:05pm

Habt ihr dazu gesicherte Kenntnisse ?

Zumindest im BASF Archiv konnte ich dazu nichts finden.

Was Bayer angeht, so wurde eine kurzzeitige vom du Pont Patent DBP 1270538 - viel Spaß bei der Analyse, ich bin kein Chemiker :D - unabhängige Eigenfertigung von CrO2 1970 durch Tellurdotierung möglich (ZS III S. 451). Ein entsprechendes Patent wurde bereits 1963 angemeldet (DBP 1467328), also zwei Jahre nach der du Pont Patentanmeldung.

Friedrich Krones 1983 in einem Interview dazu: "Wir bezogen Chromdioxid aus den USA, haben es also nicht selbst gefertigt. Die Herstellung im Autoklaven war zu teuer und nur für den damals geringen Bedarf an Amateurbändern bei kleinen Geschwindigkeiten von Interesse. Auf diesem Sektor waren wir zunächst nicht engagiert, sondern hauptsächlich auf den professionellen Gebieten Film und Rundfunk. Der Amateursektor lief sozusagen nur nebenbei, wurde dann allerdings ausgebaut, als das Chromdioxid für Compact-Cassetten gebraucht wurde …"

1969 verhandelte Philips mit du Pont über eine Lizenzfertigung, zwei Jahre später erwarb BASF die Lizenz. Hier die Pressemitteilung vom 11.5.1971: Die BASF AG, Ludwigshafen, und Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington (USA), haben einen Vertrag abgeschlossen, der es BASF erlaubt, ferromagnetisches Chromdioxid und Magnetbänder aus diesem Material herzustellen. – BASF ... hat diese Rechte an den Chromdioxid-Patenten von Du Pont erworben, um die technischen Vorteile in einer Reihe von Anwendungen zu nutzen.

Grüße, Peter

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Peter Ruhrberg" (Feb 11th 2019, 10:50pm)


Posts: 479

Date of registration: May 18th 2009

Location: Hamburg

  • Send private message

46

Monday, February 11th 2019, 10:19pm

Quoted

Ist das wirklich so ?

Wir hatten das Thema schon mal hier:
CrO2-Tonbänder aus Russland!?

Kleine Ergänzung noch:
Das Chromdioxid stellte man 1978 in kleinerem Massstab her.
Ab 1979, mit beginn der Serienfertigung der Video- und Cassettenbänder wurde das Pigment in 3 Reaktoren im Betrieb Magnetton Wolfen hergestellt und die MBF Dessau mit jährlich 50 Tonen beliefert.

Ich denke das es unzweifelhaft ist, das Wolfen Chromdioxid-Pigment hergestellt hat.

Viele Grüße
Volkmar

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Wickinger" (Feb 11th 2019, 10:49pm)


Posts: 2,486

Date of registration: Jul 5th 2006

Location: Norrköping

  • Send private message

47

Monday, February 11th 2019, 10:52pm

Peter, das ist sehr interessant und ergänzt die entsprechenden Passagen im "Zeitschichten"-Buch, 3. Auflage:

"DuPont-Magnetbänder oder von anderen mit Zukauf-Pigment gefertigte Bänder hatten ihre Premiere bei Philips zunächst als 1⁄2-Zoll-Videoband absolviert (...); Memorex führte um 1970 / 1971 Chromdioxid-Cassetten im Sortiment, nachdem Agfa bereits 1970 Kassetten aus einem von der Bayer AG entwickelten (und abweichend vom duPont-Verfahren tellur-dotierten) Chromdioxid vorgestellt hatte." (S. 451)

Das wäre zumindest schon einmal eine Bestätigung für von Du Pont selbst hergestellte Videobänder.

"Zu dieser Zeit lieferte duPont in den USA bereits CrO 2 -Kassetten aus." (S. 470)

Ha! Da sind sie. Unter welchem Namen, war dem Quellenverzeichnis leider nicht zu entnehmen.

"Zur Funkausstellung 1970 (in Düsseldorf, fast noch auf heimischem Boden) präsentierte sich Agfa-Gevaert Leverkusen als „erster europäischer Hersteller“ mit ihrer Stereochrom-Kassette auf Basis eines von der Bayer AG gefertigten, tellur-dotierten Chromdioxids." (ebenda)

Bayer hat also tatsächlich Chromdioxid hergestellt, zumindest vorübergehend.

"Etwa ab der Mitte der 1980er fertigte BASF, außer E.I. duPont de Nemours der einzige Chromdioxid-Produzent, etwa 2⁄3 der Weltproduktion, anders gesagt, die Produktion von duPont war etwa halb so groß wie die der BASF." (ebenda)

Dies spräche, zumindest für den genannten Zeitraum, gegen eine Chromdioxid-Produktion bei Orwo. Was dort allerdings inoffiziell und ohne Lizenzen passierte, entzog sich eventuell den ansonsten hervorragenden Quellen der "Zeitschichten"-Autoren. Was darüber hinaus bisher in Erfahrung zu bringen war, steht in den von Volkmar verlinkten, sehr interessanten Beiträgen.

Viele Grüße,
Martin

Posts: 387

Date of registration: Mar 29th 2016

Location: Dresden

Occupation: Prozesstechniker Halbleiterbereich

  • Send private message

48

Tuesday, February 12th 2019, 9:50am

Ab 1979, mit beginn der Serienfertigung der Video- und Cassettenbänder wurde das Pigment in 3 Reaktoren im Betrieb Magnetton Wolfen hergestellt und die MBF Dessau mit jährlich 50 Tonen beliefert.

Ich denke das es unzweifelhaft ist, das Wolfen Chromdioxid-Pigment hergestellt hat.

Vielen Dank für den Link Volkmar, genau diesen Tread hatte ich im Hinterkopf. Man muss sich diese Menge von 50 Tonnen (!!) pro Jahr, über einen Zeitraum von 10 Jahren einmal vorstellen ! Ich denke, hier hat niemand "inoffiziell und ohne Lizenzen" produziert. Es steht für meine Begriffe außer Frage, daß das eine völlig reguläre Produktion unter internationalen Lizenzbedingungen gewesen sein muss. Zumal es sich beim ORWO- CrO2 um "richtiges" CrO2 handelte und nicht um ein Chromsubstitut, wie bei den japanischen Kassetten.

Somit kommen wir jetzt dort hin, wo ich eigentlich hin wollte: Es gab nämlich nicht nur zwei CrO2- Produzenten weltweit. Wenn wir die russische Firma in Volkmars Link mitrechnen, dann waren es mindestens vier.

Grüße, Rainer